COVID-19 Travel Please adhere to local guidelines for safe and responsible travel, including following the statewide mask mandate. Read more
Butler Wash Ruins

6 Days   •   1005 Miles

Hidden Secrets

If you want to venture off the beaten path and explore hidden gems before they become Instagram-famous, then this six-day itinerary is for you.
SALT LAKE CITY

For the soul who wants to venture off the beaten path and explore hidden gems or yearns to visit places before they become Instagram-famous, we’ve got you covered. From stand-up paddleboarding through the tranquil, narrow slot canyons of Lake Powell to browsing through a massive vinyl collection at a small town record store, with this six-day itinerary you’ll find hidden gems all over Southern Utah.

Get your glamp on by spending a cool Moab night in the rustic elegance of a canvas tent warmed by a wood-fired stove. Go beyond the crowds at the national parks, finding hidden arches and views few people ever see.

Soak in the solitude that surrounds Monument Valley, its towering buttes standing as sentinels. Stay at a solar and wind-powered historic ranch house, and take in the grandeur of canyon land sunsets from the 75-foot porch.

Visit the red rock canyons, alpine peaks, forested plateaus and ruins from Ancestral Puebloans of the greater Cedar Mesa Area. Sing your heart out in the incredible acoustics of the aptly named Singing Canyon. Learn how to live off the land and survive in the wild at Boulder Outdoor Survival School. Then cap off your trip by cooling down in the mountain meadows of Eagle Point.

Day 1

Arches and Canyonlands

125 Miles

Discover the less-visited trails of Arches and Canyonlands national parks and stay the night in a unique setting that feels like camping yet is somehow much more comfortable

Day 2

Moab to Cedar Mesa

250 Miles

A day on the road. Explore 700-year-old (and older) archaeological sites well off the beaten path, see Monument Valley the way it’s meant to be seen, then grab a permit for the backcountry of Cedar Mesa, where indigenous peoples once lived yet few people today ever visit. Overnight at Valley of the Gods B&B (see Day 3) or camp under the stars at the world’s first International Dark Sky Park, Natural Bridges.

Day 3

Valley Of The Gods to Capitol Reef

180 Miles

This is the desert in high contrast, sharp relief, and lots of color. Rent a paddleboard at Bullfrog Marina for a tranquil day on Lake Powell, then head for Capitol Reef and introduce yourself to something called the Waterpocket Fold on the little-traveled Frying Pan trail between the more popular Cohab Canyon and Grand Wash. Overnight in Torrey or Boulder.

Day 4

Torrey to Panguitch

150 Miles

Explore the Burr Trail, a paved-then-graded gravel and dirt road passing through the slickrock mountains and sandstone dunes of Grand Staircase–Escalante National Monument, Capitol Reef and Glen Canyon National Recreation Area. At the very least, plan a stop at Singing Canyon though you can travel as far as you wish. With a week, stamina, and the right frame of mind, you might linger in Boulder for a serious lesson in outdoor survival. Otherwise, continue down the infamous, winding Hogsback of the All-American Road Scenic Byway 12 to the lesser-visited Upper Calf Creek Falls. Overnight in Panguitch or camp at Cedar Breaks.

Day 5

Panguitch to Cedar City

125 Miles

Linger at an idyllic reservoir on a scenic backway or set out for Kanarraville Falls, pushing yourself up the ladders and scrambles to the very end. If you feel pangs for a little civilization, drop into Cedar City for a visit to the Groovacious Record Store. Grab a bite at Centro then overnight in Cedar City.

Day 6

Cedar City To Eagle Point

175 Miles

It’s hard not to feel awe at the Parowan Gap, which seems to demonstrate prehistoric people’s strong knowledge of astronomy. While you’re in the West Desert, a visit to one of the eponymous ranges of the Basin and Range Province will introduce you to this rugged and quiet topography. Finish up the trip with some organized outdoor fun at Eagle Point Resort. For one last dash of solitude, complete the Beaver Canyon Backway to Highway 89 rather than returning directly to the interstate.

Previous Image Next Image