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Dead Horse Point State Park   |  Utah State Parks

Winter in Moab

Winter is the perfect time to experience Moab without the crowds. While winter is slower than other times of year, Moab is by no means shut down for the season. Find a place to stay and enjoy the bounty of public lands available nearby. Revel in the red rock paradise of Arches and Canyonlands, find endless snow in the La Sal Mountains and save plenty of time for shopping and dining around town. Moab is the perfect winter getaway.

How to Visit Southern Utah in Winter

Winter Activities in Moab

Backcountry Skiing in the La Sal Mountains

Photo: Jay Beyer

Winter in Canyonlands National Park

Photo: Hans Kruse

Yurt under the Milky Way at Dead Horse Point State Park.

Moab Winter Weather

Moab's winter weather is often sunny and cold. Winters typically see daytime highs in the 40s and 50s, with nighttime lows dropping well below freezing. Bundle up — layers are best — and prepare for an amazing journey. While it can be cold, there usually isn’t too much snow, so there’s plenty of opportunity for lower elevation fun like hiking and biking or even golfing. Skilled recreators can head into the mountains to enjoy winter sports like backcountry skiing and snowshoeing. Moab sees about a foot of snow a year, but the mountains receive far more of the fluffy white stuff. Average daily high and low temperatures:

October: 73/39 F (22/3 C)
November: 56/27 F (13/-2 C)  
December: 44/20 F (6/-6 C)
January: 41/17 F (5/-8 C)
February: 51/24 F (10/-4 C)

How to Pack for Winter in Southern Utah

Winter Travel Tips

Moab and the surrounding areas are incredible in the winter, so be sure to plan ahead to get the most out of your trip and have a safe journey.  

  • Be sure to check weather and road conditions before heading out (and avalanche conditions in the La Sals, if applicable). If visiting local parks and public lands, check conditions there as well since the weather and conditions can be quite different from town. 
  • If planning an outdoor adventure, leave a trip plan with an emergency contact. Always bring appropriate winter gear, including plenty of warm clothes for layering along with extras in case your clothes get wet, as well as sunglasses and sunscreen.
  • Consider traction devices for your boots if you’ll be hiking or walking on potentially icy areas, especially on steep slopes or near drop-offs.
  • Be flexible with your plans. Check the forecast the day of the trip and be prepared to switch to Plan B (which could be staying indoors) depending on conditions.
  • Make sure you and your car are prepared for winter driving, with chains or snow tires and a full winter emergency kit. 
  • When taking photos in the area, be sure to practice mindful photography.

Red Cliffs Lodge in Moab

Photo: Rosie Serago

Winter Lodging in Moab

While some lodging options close for the winter season, many more remain open year-round. Stay in a hotel, motel, resort, lodge, B&B, cabin or vacation rental during your winter visit. Or opt for a camping or glamping experience. While some campgrounds close for winter, many others remain open. If you’re camping, be sure to find out if the campground will have water available or if you’ll need to bring your own since many water systems shut down when temperatures drop below freezing. Winter campers should be well-prepared with all the gear, equipment and supplies they will need, in addition to the skills and experience to safely camp in winter conditions.

Be sure to check if your preferred accommodation is open or closed in the winter, and know that even if your first choice is shuttered for the slow season, there are plenty of other options to choose from.

Winter in Moab

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