Bryce Canyon Lodge

The Bryce Canyon Lodge is a shining example of the National Park Service rustic design from some 90 years ago, as conceived by architect Gilbert Stanley Underwood. The Bryce Canyon Lodge is the only remaining original structure Underwood designed for Bryce Canyon National Park, Zion National Park, and the North Rim of the Grand Canyon. Spending a few nights in a treasured piece of Americana is one thing; its proximity to the best hikes, sites and starry skies of Bryce Canyon is what makes it really special.

The main two-story lodge was constructed between 1924 and 1925, with additional wings added in 1926. The open log framing — with Arts and Crafts details and a large stone fireplace — are nothing short of charming. You’ll feel right at home in the unique historical ambiance of the cozy open main level, which offers a lobby, a dining room, a small auditorium, and a gift shop. Additional accommodations include satellite deluxe cabins surrounding the main lodge structure. These cabins feature rustic, exposed trusses and fireplaces. For the price and location, these Bryce Canyon lodging options really can’t be beat.

As the only place to stay within the national park, the facilities are incredibly close to the Bryce Amphitheater, where you’ll look out upon ancient red rock formations, the park’s famed hoodoos, and delightful pine forests. You can stand at scenic overlooks and take in panoramic vistas or enjoy miles of world-class hiking trails within the park. And, with such close access to the very best of Bryce Canyon National Park, there is no excuse to miss the excellent show put on by a sunrise, sunset, or the vibrant stars of the Southern Utah desert. Bryce Canyon offers one of the nation's oldest astronomy programs. In the evening, interpretive park ranger programs are held in the main lodge’s cathedral-style auditorium. When it comes to stargazing, the park has few equals. 

The lodge and cabins combine for 114 guest rooms, divided between the Sunset Point and Sunrise Point hotel-style rooms in main property and the rustic Western Cabins.

At the lodge, you’ll find the restaurant delightful for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Valhalla Pizzeria & Coffee Shop dishes up espresso, coffee, and baked goods in the morning and Italian favorites after 3 p.m.

A few additional points to note:

  • There is little to no cell phone reception at the lodge or in the park (some people will celebrate this, others might learn to).
  • There is no cooking in any of the cabins.
  • The National Park Service currently charges $30 per private vehicle at the entrance gate on Highway 63, and fees will vary if you travel by foot, bicycle, motorcycle, or commercial vehicle.

    GPS Coordinates: 37.627193, -112.167682