Currant Creek

An hour beyond Heber Valley, ascending Daniels Canyon, past the shores of Strawberry Reservoir on Highway 40 there exists a treasure trove of remote Uinta Basin fly-fishing opportunities. Currant Creek, a tributary of the Strawberry River, is off the beaten path for many anglers, offering intimate and solitary fly-fishing during the spring, summer and fall. Don’t be discouraged by the chocolaty color of the creek near Highway 40. Continue up the canyon and break out the rods above the Water Hollow inlet and start your trek upstream towards the dam.

No wider than a lane of traffic in many places, Currant Creek carves its way through silty, desert soil giving life to wildflowers, cottonwoods, moose and elk. In addition to the aforementioned critters, the beaver reigns supreme in this valley’s riparian corridor. Beavers have truly shaped the meander of Currant Creek. Their dams, constructed of mostly willow branches, have created pools that large brown trout, rainbow trout and cutthroat trout call home. Approach these dam areas very slowly and from behind to effectively present a fly to a potential player.

Beyond the beaver pools, Currant Creek’s fishy residents find shelter in very deep cut banks, downed trees, shady runs and frothing riffles. For its size, the creek sustains a high population of large fish. Browns and cutthroats in the 12- to 20+ inch range are taken regularly on dry-dropper rigs and small streamers like wooly buggers and sculpin patterns. The varied bottom structure brings to life several species of aquatic insect that trout will key in on. PMD’s, baetis, yellow sallies and caddis deserve a mention, but the terrestrial fishing tends to reign supreme into the peak summer months. You may come across some picky fish in the soft water, but matching the hatch isn’t necessary in many cases here. Attractor imitations, both dry and wet, are highly effective on these low pressure Uinta Basin freestone tailwaters.

Consider a base camp at Currant Creek Reservoir and campground.


Bloodknots LogoFishing information adapted for Visit Utah by Bloodknots/Asher Koles. Please visit Bloodknots.com for Utah fly-fishing information, journals, multimedia and guide services.